knowledge-sharing

AIA Continuing Education Sessions

Mazzetti offers the following continuing education seminars at your office. All sessions are one hour in length and provide one learning unit credit. Download a PDF version of the sessions here.

CUSTOM LIGHTING—VISION / CONCEPT / REALITY*

Help you determine custom fixture requirements and how to work through the process of designing a custom lighting fixture product, including common snags, and budgeting requirements.

METALS AND FINISHES*

Provides information about various metals and surface finishes, including alternative, sustainable processes.

HEALTHCARE LIGHTING HOW-TO*

Gives an overview of the IES and FGI guidelines for healthcare facilities. Breaking down typical room types, layouts, light levels, controls, and codes while reviewing research and industry trends.

LIGHTING FOR BEHAVIORAL HEALTH*

Provides insight on lighting for behavioral health environments, research, and design with an overview on requirements and code.

LIGHTING FOR ELDERS*

Teaches you how age affects lighting design considerations such as glare, contrast and the light needed for tasks, safety, and optimum health.

NICU LIGHTING*

Supporting Health, Comfort and Well-being for Newborns, Family and Staff Through Lighting Design–In Partnership with Institute for Patient-Centered Design
Gives an overview of lighting design options in response to the body’s biological and psychological responses to light.

TUNABLE LIGHTING IN HEALTHCARE APPLICATIONS*

Identifies how to bring beneficial results in architectural applications for hospitals, behavioral health, assisted living, and memory care.

SUSTAINABLE LIGHTING DESIGN FOR HEALTHIER SPACES

Architects are faced with the fundamental challenge of form versus function on a daily basis. Intentional lighting design can balance and inform this challenge. Lighting solutions that honor human perception, consider energy efficiency, and create state-of-the-art aesthetics can extend and enrich the design process.
In the industry, we have learned that critical factors like building form, surface reflectances, daylighting and lighting controls all play a major role in the visual quality of the built environment. With this challenge, comes healthy opportunity: there is increasing evidence of the positive impacts daylight and electric lighting systems have on human health.
This talk will outline the areas that should be addressed to achieve an efficient, yet high quality visual environment. The presentation will conclude with suggestions on what to watch for when evaluating LED technologies and how we can promote healthy environments through mindful lighting choices.

INTERACTIVE TECHNOLOGIES ENHANCING THE PATIENT, FAMILY AND STAFF EXPERIENCE

Healthcare systems are seeking answers to achieve patient engagement, ROI, patient satisfaction, staff education and collaboration, and HCAHPS scores initiatives and goals. Interactive technologies continue to advance and are playing a larger role in addressing these needs. Enhanced staff training, simplified collaboration, and expanded patient / family engagement are just a few areas that are in the spotlight. Let us take you on a journey through the advancements during the past few years and how design can be achieved to address these initiatives.

MYTH OF THE STANDARD HYBRID OR

The first hybrid operating rooms were created to combine the benefits of traditional cardiovascular open surgeries with cardiac cath procedures, for cases in which neither technique completely addressed the need. The benefits of a hybrid OR have now made it an accepted and expected operating room in most OR suites. But not all hybrids are the same—and not all hybrids are for cardiac cases.
Drawing on the experience of more than 40 hybrid rooms planned, this session will identify clinical procedural differences impacting infrastructure, layout, positioning, and technology utilization. Procedures have differing visualization requirements, varying lighting needs, specific boom placements, and precise no-fly zones. Medical technologies and room layouts from projects will be reviewed, evaluating differences between cardiac, vascular, neuro, and other procedures.

PUT YOUR GRANNY GLASSES ON

Broadening your perspective to include the elderly patient’s experience and use of technology
10,000 baby-boomers a day join Medicare, a pace that will continue for a decade. While the design of the built environment has been evolving in response, technology has often been overlooked. Granny can’t see, grab, hear, or use the standard technologies being implemented.
The industry has recognized the need for specialized environments for pediatric patients. Now we must redefine our approach to the spaces, medical equipment, and IT devices to support an aging population.
Complex medical equipment and technologies can be made less cold, less daunting, and more accessible if we focus our attention and change our perspective.

DON’T LET YOUR SMART BUILDING FORGET THE PATIENT

The “smart” building, one that uses a building management system to monitor and adjust HVAC and other systems to make the building more energy-efficient, has become a well-recognized and expected part of new healthcare construction. But can the smart building become even smarter? Can it be integrated with other technologically driven systems to be not just a smart building but a clinically smart building? In this session, presenters will explore how the Internet of Things and clinical systems can work together to positively impact clinical operations and patient experiences.

IFIT TO ICU

Monitoring trends and their impact to facility design
About 70 percent of smartphone owners use mobile apps to do various types of monitoring on a daily basis. In addition to consumer monitoring, clinical monitoring occurs in more arenas than ever before: in homes, clinics, and patient care units that traditionally have not utilized monitoring. Taken separately, each of these applications of monitoring technology have benefits in terms of patient care and outcomes. But is there an added benefit of their aggregation? How do these new technologies impact facility design and operations? This session addresses trends and drivers, space programming considerations, infrastructure planning, and technologies associated with patient monitoring.

IMPLEMENTING TECHNOLOGIES FOR THE REDUCTION OF HOSPITAL ACQUIRED INFECTIONS

Much of our collective attention has been focused on exotic outbreaks like Ebola, while hospital acquired infections (HAI’s) continue almost unnoticed, sickening more than 700,000 patients a year and costing healthcare systems $10 billion to treat. Combating the spread of HAI’s requires a set of practices, the effectiveness of which can be enhanced by medical technology. This session will explore the range of technologies available, evaluate their effectiveness, and identify design considerations associated with each.

DESIGNING FOR SUSTAINABLE BEHAVIOR

Humans are predictably irrational. We naturally adopt mental heuristics (rules of thumb) to speed analysis and decision making. Understanding these mental pathways has already led to revolutions in fields like finance and policy. Let’s use behavior science to revolutionize sustainability in the built environment.
This interactive session explores insights from neuroscience and behavioral science to better understand human decision-making and its effect on human well-being. We analyze how to leverage these insights to influence healthy behaviors and sustainable resource use in the design of the built environment.

*Sponsored by Visa Lighting

 

Our Presenters

Jeff Looney
Associate Principal, Technology Division Leader

Terry Esquibell, BS
Associate Principal, Technology Team Leader

Josh Kelly, BS, RCDD
Technology Team Leader

Bill Hinton, CNMT, MHA
Associate Principal, Technology Team Leader

Brennan Schumacher, LEED AP
Senior Associate, Lighting Designer

Lauren Schwade, LC, EDAC, IES
Associate, Senior Lighting Designer

Robert Hume, BS, PE, CCNA
Senior Technology Consultant

Bill Miles, PE, BSEE, MCSE
Senior Technology Consultant

Nikki Tuft, BME, BE
Senior Technology Consultant

Christena Fournier, MSHCA
Technology Consultant